Are You a Fabricaholic?


Fabric quiz--

Misinformation about fabric flows freely in sewing circles. Learn how accurate your information is by answering the true or false questions below.

  1. Fabric is a creative stimulant.
  2. It is okay to mix fabric with with other craft items.
  3. Using only 100% cotton does not lead to serious fabric problems.
  4. Anyone can sew two or three quilt blocks without their behaviour and judgement changing noticeably.
  5. It's easy to quit quilting anytime you want to.

Self Assessment--

Having the facts is only part of making careful decisions about fabric use. Analyze your attitudes and behaviour by answering the following self-assessment questions.

  1. Are you unable to stop quilting after a certain number of projects?
  2. Do you need new fabric to get motivated?
  3. Do you often forget what happened around you while you were sewing?
  4. Do you quilt alone?
  5. Have others annoyed you by criticizing your quilting?
  6. Have you been involved in fights with your friends or family while you were trying to quilt?
  7. Have you bought fabric while thinking about quilting, then later regretted it?
  8. Have you destroyed or damaged property in order to quilt?
  9. Do you drive while thinking about quilts?
  10. Have you been physically hurt while quilting?
  11. Have you dropped or chosen friends based on whether or not they quilt?
  12. Do you think you are a normal quilter despite friend's comments that you sew too much?
  13. Have you ever missed class or work because you were quilting all night and couldn't get up on time?
  14. Have you ever done poorly on an exam or presentation because you spent too much time quilting?
  15. Do you think about fabric and quilting a lot?
  16. Do you feel guilty or self-conscious because of your quilting?

If you answered "yes" to three or more of these questions, or if your answer to any of these questions concerns you, you may be using fabric in ways that are harmful. Do not waste your time blaming yourself for shopping binges or any other fabric-related behaviour. If you think you have or might be developing problems in which fabric plays a part, act now. You can get help.

Remember, stick to your limits. You can stay in control of situations that involve fabric even though others may pressure you to change your mind. Here are some tips that may help:

-- It is always okay to refuse fabric. Be polite but firm in your refusal and maintain eye contact. If the offer is repeated, you can still stick to your decision. Say that you prefer not to add fabric to your collection today. In some instances you might need to walk away or reverse the pressure with a comment like, "Why is it so important to you that I have this fabric?"

-- Before entering a quilting shop or other place where fabric is available, decide how much fabric you plan to buy. Know what non-fabric items you plan to purchase once you have reached your pre-determined fabric limit.

-- Get involved in a range of activities which you enjoy. This will help you make friendships that are not focused on quilting and enable you to suggest alternative activities to friends with whom you habitually quilt.

Some of the friends urging you to quilt might have quilting problems themselves. For information about helping them, talk to a counselor in the community or read the American Health Association brochure "How to Help a Friend with a Fabric Problem."


Dawn Duperault, 1995. Permission granted to distribute to your friends and quilting guilds.

Last Updated: 3/20/96

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